Real Steel

Hey. So I’ve decided to take a leaf out of James Clear’s life and update this blog biweekly, on Mondays and Thursdays. This will give me the opportunity to read more and add invaluable, researched content and not just opinions on this blog. It will also give you the opportunity to reflect and apply anything that impresses you. Till Monday, stay awesome.


‘There could be a freak accident
There could be a fatal disease
I know we hate to think about it
But it’s as real as you and me
It’s as real as you and me’

-Prophetess Rihanna

I’ll give props where they’re due, I heard the prophet Riri joke from Michael Todd first. However, the joke isn’t the focus but the lyrics. Can we sing those without any hypocrisy? When I ask this question I have to zoom in on “as real as you and me.” How real are you? Are you like the machine from Real Steel where actual props were created computer graphics served only as an embellishment?

To cap off the discussion we’ve had about being vulnerable I’d like to urge you to take a look at yourself… and then make a change!

-MJ

No, that’s not it. I mean to take a deep, introspective look at yourself. Go on a self date. Sounds mad odd but with quarantine in place that should be easy right? Find out what you really like, what your pet peeves are. What shows do you enjoy watching? What would you do when no one was there to pressure you or shame you into doing something else. When I was 10 I had the immense privilege of sharing 2 hours a day on a bus ride with someone I looked up to. I guess it was just pure awe at how well they adapted to the environment and at the way popularity appeared to wrap around them like a second skin. This person had an annoying habit though. (Insert petty Ayanda here.) They always seemed to know every lyric of every song that came out that week. That’s perfectly fine. What was irritating was the apparent, irresistible compulsion to ask me if I had heard the songs in question. I wasn’t one to keep up to date with music. I have no idea what spirit would possess them whenever I said this, which was perhaps 97% of the time, but it drove them to do that undoubtedly annoying thing that’s probably happened to you at least once.

“Don’t you know this song?” they would ask.

“Nope,” I’d respond, candid and more than a little uninterested.

“But surely, you know it?” they would ask again.

This is when I would think to myself, How bad am I at communicating? I’m sure I was straightforward in my acknowledgement of not knowing the song.

“Never heard of it. Don’t know a single word.”

“HoW cOUld yOu NOt kNOW thIs SoNG?” they’d conclude and then go on to recite the whole thing splendidly.

In retrospect, I find myself truly hoping that they enjoyed listening to music in their spare time and didn’t spend countless hours watching TRACE with a notebook in hand to impress others by their knowledge of lyrics. I truly hope that this was a manifestation of their authentic self (even though it was more than slightly annoying at the time), and not a try-hard imitation.

Does this story have a point? Uhm… sure. I hope so! Oh yes, it’s come back to me now.

I was so firm in my identity as a non-music lover that for three years on the same bus, Mr Music finally stopped badgering me perhaps after one too many occasions where the stunt didn’t have the desired effect. I assume he relented when it finally dawned on him that I was significantly more passionate about Animorphs, Goosebumps or any other work of fiction I had in hand every single day.

I had the option to change from my real self to fit in with the purveyor of swag (in the form of lyrics) but even then, as a 10-year-old boy, I knew that such a change would be inauthentic and therefore, not worth it.

That was one instance. My goal is to make that ubiquitous throughout my life.

In the words of popular comedian Andrew Schulz, renowned for his ability to tell jokes with hard punchlines while flying in the face of being politically correct:

By being truly authentic you do not need to gravitate to the world, the world will gravitate to you.

Check out the last 5 minutes of his TedX talk here: Andrew Schulz On Authenticity

Image source: WallpaperAccess

Thanks for reading! See you on Monday.

One thought on “Real Steel

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